Showing 17 results

Person/organization
Simon Fraser University Special Collections and Rare Books

Baird, Laura

  • Person
  • 1955-

Laura N. Baird was born in Ottawa, Ontario in 1955. She studied Theatre Craft and Design at the Banff School of Fine Arts, earning a Senior Diploma in 1974. In 1979, she completed a Senior Diploma from the Emily Carr College of Art. From 1978 to 1981, undertook graduate work at Emily Carr and at the School of Arts, Columbia University. She earned a Master of Fine Arts Degree from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in 1982. Baird is a conceptual artist, working with diverse media, including photography and textiles. She has lived in various parts of Canada and the United States of America, before settling in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Blaser, Robin

  • Person
  • 1925-2009

Robin Blaser was born in Colorado on May 18, 1925, and raised in Idaho. He was educated at the University of California at Berkeley, where he was a principal member of the group of poets that became known as the ‘Berkeley Renaissance’, together with Jack Spicer and Robert Duncan. In 1955 he moved to Boston, where he worked as a librarian at Harvard’s Widener Library. He returned to San Francisco in 1959 where he worked at the California Historical Society and San Francisco State University. He moved to Vancouver, BC in 1966 and worked for Simon Fraser University, where he taught in the English Department until his retirement as a Full Professor in 1986. He became a Canadian citizen in 1972. Blaser has influenced and mentored many writers, including Stan Persky, Brian Fawcett, Sharon Thesen, George Bowering, and Phyllis Webb, among others. He has published numerous works of poetry, many of them sections of a single long serial-poem collected in The Holy Forest (1993). He was also an essayist, librettist, and editor, most notably of The Collected Books of Jack Spicer (1975). In 1995 his achievement was celebrated with a major conference, The Recovery of the Public World, held in Vancouver and attended by many notable Canadian and American poets. He was appointed to the Order of Canada in 2005. In 2006 he received a special Lifetime Recognition Award from the trustees of the Griffin Trust for Excellence in Poetry. He also won the Griffin Trust for Excellence in Poetry in 2008 for his revised and expanded edition of The Holy Forest (2008). In 2009, he was awarded an honorary doctorate by Simon Fraser University. Blaser wrote and resided in Vancouver, BC until his death in 2009.

Coady, Lynn

  • Person
  • 1970-

Lynn Coady was born in Sydney, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia and grew up in Port Hawkesbury, Cape Breton. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Carleton University and earned a Master of Fine Arts degree in creative writing from the University of British Columbia in 1997. In addition to a nomination for the Governor General's Award for fiction in 1998 for her first novel, "Strange Heaven," Coady's works have earned her numerous nominations and awards. Coady has taught creative writing at Simon Fraser University and in other venues, and she has worked as a freelance writer and journalist, publishing works of fiction and non-fiction in a range of anthologies and periodicals. She has also written several plays and a screenplay.

Davey, Frank

  • Person
  • 1940-

Frankland Wilmot Davey (born April 19, 1940) is a Canadian poet and scholar/critic and an important figure in the countrys post-modern literary scene. Born in Vancouver, British Columbia, he attended the University of British Columbia where he was one of the founding editors of the poetry journal TISH and also edited the journal OPEN LETTER. In 1968, he received a Ph.D. from the University of Southern California. He then became a professor at York University in Toronto. He currently lives in Strathroy, Ontario. He has published numerous volumes of poetry, as well as monographs on Margaret Atwood and Earle Birney and other non-fiction works.

Giguere, Perry Joseph

  • Person
  • 1950 Dec 16-2018 Jun 17

Giguere was born in Quebec City on December 16, 1950. After spending his early years in Montreal, he moved to Vancouver in 1973. While studying to be an actor at the Firehall Theatre in 1978, he was approached to put up promotional posters for the theatre and postering soon turned into a full-time, forty year career. Giguere passed away in Vancouver on June 17, 2018. He had two daughters, Emilie and Jessie.

Kiyooka, Roy

  • Person
  • 1926-1994

Roy Kenzie Kiyooka (January 18, 1926 January 8, 1994) was an influential Canadian photographer, poet and artist of national and international acclaim. A Nisei or second generation Japanese Canadian, Kiyooka was born in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan and raised in Calgary, Alberta. In 1942, following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, he and his family were uprooted and interned. Kiyooka studied at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology and Art, and first made a name for himself as painter. He taught in Halifax at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, and in 1973 he was hired as an instructor of painting at the University of British Columbia Faculty of Fine Arts. During this period, his work turned increasingly away from painting to other forms of visual and performing arts, and to writing. His book, Pear Tree Pomes, was nominated for the 1987 Governor General's Award. In 1978, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada.

Lambert, Betty

  • Person
  • 1933-1983

Elizabeth M. (Betty) Lambert (nee Lee) (1933 1983) was a renowned Canadian playwright. Born in Calgary, Alberta, she began to write at an early age, winning awards in high school and for her writing while studying at the University of British Columbia. In 1956, she received the Brissenden Creative Writing Award and in 1957 the Macmillan Best Short Story Award. Her 1967 children's play "Tumult with Indians" won her the Canadian Centennial Award for best historical children's play. From 1965 to 1983, Lambert taught at in the English Department at Simon Fraser University while continuing to write stage, radio and television plays, short stories and one published novel. Her best-known works were the childrens play The Riddle Machine, the radio play Grasshopper Hill, the comedy vSqrieux-de-Dieu, her novel and the dramas Under the Skin and Jennies Story, which was adapted into the film Heart of the Sun in 1999. Betty Lambert passed away in 1983.

Layton, Irving

  • Person
  • 1912-2006

Irving Layton, OC (March 12, 1912 January 4, 2006) was an award-winning Montreal-based Canadian poet, author of more than forty books. Raymond Jennings is with the Philosophy Department at Simon Fraser University. As an undergraduate student at Queen's University, Jennings studied the work of Irving Layton.

Mills, John

  • Person
  • 1930-

John Mills is a British-born, Vancouver-based novelist. He taught in the English Department at Simon Fraser University from the mid-1960s through 1990s. His major published works include "Runner in the Dark", "land of is", and "Thank You Mother for the Rabbits".

Mootoo, Shani

  • Person
  • 1957-

Shani Mootoo is known for her work as an artist and writer. She was born in Ireland in 1957, grew up in Trinidad, and has lived in Canada since the early 1980s. Mootoo studied fine arts at the University of Western Ontario where she began to paint and produce video works. She earned a master of fine arts equivalent at the Emily Carr College of Art and Design in Vancouver in 1982. Mootoo's collection of short stories Out on Main Street was published in 1993. This was followed in 1996 by her first novel, Cereus Blooms at Night, which was published in fourteen countries and was a finalist for the Giller Prize, the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize, and the Chapters/Books in Canada First Novel Award. In 2001, Mootoo published a collection of poetry, The Predicament of Or. Her second novel, He Drown She in the Sea, was published in May 2005. Mootoo has been a writer in residence at the University of Alberta, at Mills College in Oakland, California, and at the Varuna Writers Residency program in Australia. She has taught writing at the University of Alberta, Capilano College in North Vancouver, the BC Festival of the Arts, and the BC Arts Council. Her visual art and video productions have been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Queens Museum, the Vancouver Art Gallery, and the Venice Biennale.

Persky, Stan

  • Person
  • 1941-

Stan Persky (born 19 January 1941) is a Canadian writer, media commentator and philosophy instructor. Persky was born in Chicago, Illinois. As a teenager, he made contact with and received encouragement from Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and other writers of the Beat Generation. Persky served in the United States Navy, and then settled in San Francisco, California in the early 1960s, becoming part of a group of writers that included Jack Spicer, Robert Duncan, Robin Blaser and George Stanley. In 1966, Persky moved to Vancouver, Canada, and attended the University of British Columbia, receiving degrees in anthropology and sociology. He became a Canadian citizen in 1972. During the 1960s and '70s, he was prominent as a student and civic activist, was an early staff member of the alternative newspaper The Georgia Straight, and co-founder with Dennis Wheeler of the "Georgia Straight Writing Supplement," which eventually became New Star Books. After university, Persky worked at Vancouver Mental Patients Association and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation before becoming a college instructor. Since 1983, he has worked primarily at Capilano University in North Vancouver, first in political studies and then in philosophy. Since 1990, Persky has resided part-time in Vancouver and in Berlin, Germany. He worked as a media commentator for the CBC, a literary columnist for The Globe and Mail and The Vancouver Sun, and has written for The Body Politic, This Magazine, New Directions, Saturday Night, Sodomite Invasion Review, Books in Canada and most recently The Tyee. He is also a frequent contributor to Dooney's Cafe. Stan Persky is a long-time Vancouver public intellectual and literary activist.

Robertson, Lisa

  • Person
  • 1961-

Lisa Robertson was born on 22 July 1961 in Newmarket, Ontario. In 1979, she moved to Vancouver, where she attended Simon Fraser University and became involved in the Kootenay School of Writing, an artist-run collective that works to advance avant-garde writing practices. Robertson is the author of several books of poetry, including The Apothecary (1991), XEclogue (1993), Debbie: An Epic (1997), The Weather (2001), Rousseaus Boat (2004), and The Men: A Lyric Book (2006), and has contributed to various anthologies. She has also written many chapbooks; essays and reviews on poetry, contemporary art, and architecture; and regular columns for various magazines and journals (among them, Mix Magazine and the interior design magazine, Nest). She edited the 2006 Griffin Poetry Prize Anthology, and has worked in an editorial capacity on several journals, including Raddle Moon, Front, and Barscheit. Robertson has received wide recognition for her work: She was nominated for the Governor General's Award for Poetry in 1998 for Debbie: An Epic; she won the Relit Award for Poetry in 2002 for The Weather; and in 2006, she received the bpNichol Chapbook Award for Rousseaus Boat. In 1999, Robertson was granted the Judith E Wilson Visiting Fellowship in Poetry by the University of Cambridge. She was a visiting poet and lecturer at the University of California at San Diego in 2003, and in 2006/7, she served as the Roberta C. Holloway Lecturer in the Practice of Poetry at the University of California at Berkeley. Currently (2008) she is a visiting artist and lecturer at the California College of the Arts. She has taught at Capilano College, the American University of Paris, Dartington College for the Arts, and at Naropa University's Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics. She has also served on the advisory boards of Artspeak Gallery and Emily Carr Institute Press, and as a judge for the Griffin Poetry Prize. Between 2003 and 2007, Robertson lived in France. She now lives in Oakland, CA.

Spicer, Jack

  • Person
  • 1925-1965

Jack Spicer (January 30, 1925 - August 17, 1965) was an American poet often identified with the San Francisco [Poetry] Renaissance. Spicer was born in Rhode Island and moved to Los Angeles at the age of 10 where he later attended the University of Redlands. He spent most of his writing life in San Francisco and spent the years 1945 to 1955 at the University of California, Berkeley, where he began writing, doing work as a research linguist, and publishing some poetry (though he disdained publishing). During this time he searched out fellow poets, but it was through his alliance with Robert Duncan, Robin Blaser and Landis Everson that Spicer forged a new kind of poetry, and together they referred to their common work as the Berkeley Renaissance. The four, who were all gay, also educated younger poets in their circle about their "queer genealogy", Rimbaud, Lorca, and other gay writers. In 1954, Spicer co-founded the Six Gallery, the scene of the famous October 1955 reading that launched the West Coast Beat movement. In 1955, Spicer moved to New York and then to Boston, where he worked for a time in the Rare Book Room of Boston Public Library. He returned to San Francisco in 1956 and in 1957, Spicer ran a workshop called Poetry as Magic at San Francisco State College, which was attended by Duncan, Helen Adam, Joe Dunn, Jack Gilbert, and George Stanley. Spicer's view of the role of language in the process of writing poetry was probably the result of his knowledge of modern pre-Chomskian linguistics and his experience as a research linguist at Berkeley. In his legendary Vancouver lectures he elucidated his ideas on "transmissions" (dictations) from the outside, using the comparison of the poet as crystal set or radio receiving transmissions from outer space, or Martian transmissions. Although seemingly far-fetched, his view of language as "furniture", through which the transmissions negotiate their way, is grounded in the structuralist linguistics of Zellig Harris and Charles Hockett. (In fact, the poems of his final book, Language, refer to linguistic concepts such as morphemes and graphemes.) As such, Spicer is acknowledged as a precursor and early inspiration for the Language poets. However, many working poets today list Spicer in their succession of precedent figures. Spicer died as a result of his alcoholism and his reputed last words to Robin Blaser were "My vocabulary did this to me. Your love will let you go on." Since the posthumous publication of The Collected Books of Jack Spicer (first published in 1975), his popularity and influence has steadily risen, affecting poetry throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe. A collected works entitled My Vocabulary Did This to Me: The Collected Poetry of Jack Spicer (Peter Gizzi and Kevin Killian, editors) was published by Wesleyan University Press in 2008.

Stuart, Colin

  • Person
  • 20 Jun 1949-21 May 2018

Colin Christopher Stuart was a Canadian poet closely associated with the West Coast poetry movement of the 1960s and 1970s and the 'New American Poetry' anthologized by Donald Allen.
A shy and withdrawn child prodigy, Colin was one of the five children of W.M.P. (Manfred) Stuart and Bessie Dolina Stuart (nee Macaulay). He grew up in Vancouver and Burnaby, composing poetry and playing the bagpipes in the Vancouver Kiwanis Boys Pipe Band, with which he competed at the 1962 Edinburgh Festival.

He attended Simon Fraser University at an early age, was present at the 1965 Berkeley Poetry Conference and graduated from SFU with a degree in English literature. He began a graduate degree at SFU, which he did not complete, but was awarded a Canada Council grant for further studies in poetics and for a time did graduate work in Buffalo, N.Y. In 1974 he attended the British School of Classical Studies in Athens.

His early writing was published in numerous Canadian and American poetry magazines of the 1960s and early 1970s, including TISH, Talon, Capilano Review, Pacific Nation, Skree, Iron, Writing (George Straight Writing Supplement), Fathar (Bolinas), and Boundary 2 (Buffalo). His critical and poetic work responded to a number of influences: Black Mountain poetics, Post-structuralist philosophy, psychoanalytic theory, English romanticism, French symbolism, and Islamic religious writings. In addition to Blaser’s mentorship, Stuart’s work was supported by broad community of artists and writers: Laura Baird, John “Jack” Clarke, Pierre Coupey, Susan Knutson, and Duncan McNaughton.
By the mid/late 1970s he seemed poised to establish himself as a leading younger Canadian poet but suffered setbacks in his personal life, including a falling-out with his one-time mentor and SFU graduate supervisor, the poet Robin Blaser. He halted the volume of his poems Talonbooks was preparing for publication in the early 1980s, and in later years became isolated from former friends and colleagues, suffering from mental and physical health issues, addiction, brushes with the law, and homelessness on Vancouver's Downtown Eastside. Though he continued to write, he avoided any further publication in his lifetime. He died in Vancouver's West End in 2018 at the age of 69, leaving a large archive of his life's work - manuscripts composed over a period of fifty years.

Wachtel, Eleanor

  • Person
  • 1947-

Eleanor Wachtel, CM is a Canadian writer and broadcaster. She currently hosts the weekly literary show Writers and Company on CBC Radio One. She was born and raised in Montreal, where she took a B.A. in English literature at McGill University. Wachtel lived for a time in the United States and Kenya, and then in the mid-'70s worked as a freelance writer and broadcaster in Vancouver. She has co-edited two books: The Expo Story (1986), and Language in Her Eye (1990), and is the co-author of A Feminist Guide to the Canadian Constitution (1992). In 1993, Knopf Canada published a selection of interviews called Writers and Company; More Writers and Company was published in the fall of 1996. In spring 2003, HarperCollins brought out another selection, Original Minds. Wachtel is a contributor to the best-seller, Dropped Threads (2001), co-edited by Carol Shields, and Lost Classics (2000), co-edited by Michael Ondaatje et al. In 2007, she published Random Illuminations: Conversations With Carol Shields. For five years she was Adjunct Professor of Women's Studies at Simon Fraser University. In the fall of 1987, Wachtel moved to Toronto to work full-time as Literary Commentator on CBC Stereo's State of the Arts, and then as writer-broadcaster for The Arts Tonight, and Toronto reporter for The Arts Report. She was host of The Arts Tonight from 1996 to 2007, and has been host of CBC Radio's Writers & Company since its inception in 1990. In 1995 and again in 2003, Writers & Company won the CBC Award for Programming Excellence for the best weekly show broadcast nationally In 2002, Eleanor Wachtel was named winner of the Jack Award for the promotion of Canadian books. Wachtel has received six honorary degrees. In 2005, Wachtel was named a member of the Order of Canada.

Wah, Fred

  • Person
  • 1939-

Fred Wah (born January 23, 1939) is a Canadian poet, novelist, and scholar involved in the post-modern literary scene in Canada, both as teacher and writer. He was born in Swift Current, Saskatchewan, but raised in the interior of British Columbia. His father was a Canadian-born but raised in China, who was born to a Chinese father and an English mother, while his mother a Swedish-born Canadian who came to Canada at age 6. His diverse ethnic makeup figures significantly in his writings. In 1962, Wah married Pauline Butling, a teacher, writer, and literary critic. Wah studied Music and English at the University of British Columbia (BA 1963), did some graduate work in English Literature at the University of New Mexico from 1963-1964, and completed an MA in English at the State University of New York Buffalo in 1967.

Wah is primarily known as a poet and has published numerous books of poetry, including “Lardeau” (1965), “Breathin' My Name with a Sigh” (1981); “Waiting for Saskatchewan” (1985), winner of the Governor-General’s Award for Poetry, “Music at the Heart of Thinking” (1987); “Alley Alley Homefree” (1992); and “is a door” (2009), winner of the Dorothy Livesay Prize for Poetry. He is the author of the bio-fiction “Diamond Grill” (1996), winner of the Howard O'Hagan prize for short fiction. He has also written many works of nonfiction. His collection of critical essays “Faking it: Poetics and Hybridity” (2000), winner of the Gabrielle Roy Prize for Criticism, represents fifteen years of his writings in various forms.

Wah has worked as an instructor of English composition and literature at various academic institutions. From 1967-1989, he taught writing at Selkirk College in Castlegar, British Columbia, while living in South Slocan. He also taught at David Thompson University Centre in Nelson, British Columbia, until the school’s closing in 1984. When the David Thompson University Centre closed in 1984, Wah was involved in establishing the Kootenay School of Writing in its place, and from 1995-1999, Wah served as an electronic writing advisor for the Kootenay School of Art. In 1989, he was appointed professor of English at the University of Calgary, a position he held until 2003, when he retired and became professor emeritus. He taught courses in English composition and literature. In 1995, Wah taught a graduate seminar on bpNichol’s “The Martyrology” at the University of Calgary in conjunction with Roy Miki, who taught a section of the same seminar at Simon Fraser University.

Wah has also worked extensively as an editor, both for literary periodicals, and as editor for the poetry manuscripts of friends, colleagues, and peers. While at the University of British Columbia, he was a founding editor and contributor to the poetry newsletter “TISH,” and served as Associate Editor from 1961 to 1963. Well known for his work on literary journals and small-press, Wah has been a contributing editor to the journal “Open Letter” since its beginning in 1970, involved in the editing of “West Coast Line,” and, along with Frank Davey, he co-edited the world's first online literary magazine, SwiftCurrent in 1986. From 1992-1993, he was part of the editorial collective of “Appropriate Voice,” the newsletter for the Racial Minorities Committee of the Writers’ Union of Canada, and also worked to organize a conference of the same name held in May 1992 in Orilla, Ontario. From 2003 to 2008 Wah served as poetry editor for “The Literary Review of Canada.”

Wah has been a member of various committees, both academic and non-academic. At the University of Calgary, he served on the Markin-Flanagan Distinguished Authors Programme Steering Committee 1993-1994, 1996-1997, and 2000-2001. A long-time member of the Writers’ Union of Canada, Wah served on the National Council Executive from 1996-1997, on the National Executive from 2000-2001, and was Chair of the Union from 2001-2002. From 1990-1994, he served on the Racial Minorities Committee of the union.

Wah served as the Parliamentary Poet Laureate of Canada from 2012-2013, and in 2013 was appointed to the Order of Canada.