Technical University of British Columbia

Identity area

Type of entity

Corporate body

Authorized form of name

Technical University of British Columbia

Parallel form(s) of name

Standardized form(s) of name according to other rules

Other form(s) of name

Identifiers for corporate bodies

Description area

Dates of existence

1997 - 2002

History

The Technical University of British Columbia had its roots in the Fraser Valley University Society, a group of concerned citizens founded in February 1991 to lobby government for the creation of a university in the Fraser Valley. On February 2, 1995, the Society's efforts were rewarded when Premier Mike Harcourt announced that $100 million would be provided for the establishment of a technical university in Cloverdale. According to the "Statement of Government Purpose" that was issued for the university, there was to be an emphasis on access, applied research, innovative programs, and the use of new learning technologies. Partnerships were to be developed with private industry to decrease operating costs, and there would be a unique governance structure.

On May 1st 1995, thirteen people were appointed by the Minister of Skills, Training and Labour to an Interim Planning Council (IPC), which was to provide advice to the government regarding the mandate and characteristics of the "Technical University of British Columbia" (TechBC); the first meeting of the IPC took place on June 10th. The original terms of reference for the University were delivered by the Ministry on May 8th, and on August 10th the original constitution and bylaws were registered, under the name "Technical University Society of British Columbia." The first President of TechBC, Dr. Bernard Sheehan, an original IPC member, was appointed on January 1, 1996. On September 27, 1996 the IPC presented its final report to the Provincial Government, and on October 19th the twenty member Council was replaced by a five member Interim Governing Board.

The establishing legislation for the Technical University of British Columbia, Bill 30, was introduced on June 9, 1997, and the Government announced a $2.8 million operating grant for the University. On July 28th, Bill 30 received its third reading; however, the lack of a union, tenure, and a senate in the proposed governance structure prompted the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) to protest the bill. When the "Technical University of British Columbia Act" was eventually proclaimed on December 5, 1997, CAUT boycotted the new University. The first meeting of the Board of Governors was one week later, on December 12th. An Academic Planning Board was created in place of a senate and on May 8, 1998, the CAUT boycott was lifted.

During this entire period, the University's location was a source of controversy and dispute. The Cloverdale site was deemed unsuitable and, eventually, on July 20, 1998 it was announced that the University campus would be constructed at Surrey City Centre. On October 14th, TechBC's Education and Information Centre at Surrey Place Mall was officially opened, although some students had been attending classes offered through other universities at that location since September 10th. The first ninety students for TechOne, the required first year program for TechBC students, did not begin classes until the following September, and the official opening ceremony for the University was held at Surrey Place Mall on October 14, 1999. A few weeks earlier, on September 23rd, a second announcement had been made confirming plans to construct a 450,000 square foot campus at Surrey City Centre; the development project, scheduled for completion in 2003, would be a joint venture with ICBC, the City of Surrey, and the Provincial Government. In July 2000, the amount of space allocated to TechBC at Surrey Place Mall was increased to 110,000 square feet.

When it opened, TechBC offered Bachelor of Science and Master of Applied Science degrees in three program areas: Information Technology, Interactive Arts, and Management and Technology. In May 2000 the University received government approval for a PhD. program in Applied Science to begin in February 2001.

TechBC Corporation, a wholly-owned, for revenue subsidiary of TechBC, was created in October 1999 in order to establish partnerships with private industry, conduct applied research, and develop and support new businesses.

In September 2000 Sheehan resigned, and the search for a new President began; Dr. Jean Watters was selected, and he began his term in August 2001. His term, however, would be a short one. In May 2001 a Liberal government had been elected in British Columbia. After months of investigation into the TechBC situation, the Government withdrew its support of the University. On February 7, 2002 it was announced that TechBC would be closed at the end of the academic year, and its students and modified programs transferred to Simon Fraser University, although the Surrey campus would remain in use. Watters' last day as President was March 20, 2002.

Places

Legal status

Functions, occupations and activities

Mandates/sources of authority

Internal structures/genealogy

General context

Relationships area

Related entity

Fraser Valley University Society (1991 - 1998)

Identifier of the related entity

Category of the relationship

temporal

Dates of the relationship

1998 - February 1998

Description of relationship

Fraser Valley University Society transferred function to Technical University of British Columbia: Fundraising responsibilities for the Technical University of British Columbia

Related entity

Technical University Society of British Columbia (1995 - )

Identifier of the related entity

Category of the relationship

temporal

Dates of the relationship

1996-10-10 - 1997

Description of relationship

Technical University Society of British Columbia predecessor of Technical University of British Columbia

Related entity

Technical University of British Columbia. Interim Governing Board (1996 - 1997)

Identifier of the related entity

Category of the relationship

temporal

Dates of the relationship

1995 - 1996

Description of relationship

Technical University of British Columbia. Interim Governing Board predecessor of Technical University of British Columbia

Related entity

Technical University of British Columbia. Interim Planning Council. (1995 - 1996)

Identifier of the related entity

Category of the relationship

temporal

Dates of the relationship

1985 - 2002-03-20

Description of relationship

Technical University of British Columbia. Interim Planning Council. predecessor of Technical University of British Columbia

Related entity

Fraser Valley University Society (1991 - 1998)

Identifier of the related entity

Category of the relationship

associative

Dates of the relationship

1998 - 2004

Description of relationship

Fraser Valley University Society associated with Technical University of British Columbia

Related entity

Watters, Jean

Identifier of the related entity

Category of the relationship

associative

Dates of the relationship

August 2001 - 20 March 2002

Description of relationship

Jean Watters officer of Technical University of British Columbia: President

Related entity

Sheehan, Bernard

Identifier of the related entity

Category of the relationship

associative

Dates of the relationship

1 January 1996 - August 2001

Description of relationship

Bernard Sheehan officer of Technical University of British Columbia: President

Access points area

Occupations

Control area

Authority record identifier

Institution identifier

Rules and/or conventions used

Status

Level of detail

Dates of creation, revision and deletion

Language(s)

Script(s)

Sources

Maintenance notes

  • Clipboard

  • Export

  • EAC