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Archival description
Simon Fraser University Archives and Records Management Department Collection
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Simon Fraser University aerial and construction photograph collection

  • F-30
  • Collection
  • 1963 - 1978

The collection was compiled by the University Archives staff to illustrate the construction of Simon Fraser University.

The history of Simon Fraser University is reflected in its world-renowned architecture. Located atop Burnaby Mountain, SFU's design was the result of a competition held in 1963 by Dr. Gordon Shrum, the newly-appointed Chancellor of the University. The goal of the competition was to produce five winners. One architect would be awarded first prize for the overall design of SFU, while four other architects would each be invited to build a section of the University under the supervision of the winner. All entries were limited to applicants from British Columbia.

The informal guidelines for SFU's design consisted of a directive from Dr. Shrum entitled, "Notes from the Chancellor," which was distributed to the applicants. In this directive, Dr. Shrum noted many of the features that he felt were essential to the new university based upon his previous experience at the University of British Columbia. Among his recommendations were that students should be able to move from one part of the university to another without going outside, and that the large lecture theaters should be grouped together rather than scattered over the whole campus. Perhaps the most important of his criteria was that SFU should appear in 1965 essentially as it would look in 1995. In other words, it should look like a finished university, but also be designed for expansion. The design chosen was that of a young UBC architecture professor, Arthur Erickson, and his colleague Geoffrey Massey. The four other winners were William R. Rhone and Randle Iredale; Zoltan Kiss; Duncan McNab, Harry Lee, and David Logan; and Robert F. Harrison. The Erickson and Massey design had been the unanimous choice of the judges, and had met all the requirements that Shrum had outlined in his memo.

The collection consists of photographic prints and contact sheets that illustrate the physical development of SFU including site clearance, excavation, the construction of individual buildings, and completed buildings and interiors. There are a number of aerial photographs. The collection also includes photographs of the University's opening ceremonies and the installation of Dr. Shrum as Chancellor and Patrick McTaggart-Cowan as President.

Archives and Records Management Department

Simon Fraser University poster collection

  • F-211
  • Collection
  • 1969 - 2005

Collection consists of SFU campus posters promoting the university or advertising social and academic events on campus, and departmental programs. Also included are departmental strike posters related to the 1969 strike in the Department of Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology, and a "Shift Shell" bumper sticker related to the 1966 protest about the Shell Gas Station on campus.

Archives and Records Management Department

Simon Fraser collection

  • F-208
  • Collection
  • 1803 - [ca. 2014]

Collection consists of records relating to the personal history and genealogy of the university's namesake, the explorer, Simon Fraser. Records include; correspondence, working papers, reports, newsletters, newspaper clippings, photographs and negatives, drawings, artifacts and textiles.

Sterling Prize collection

  • F-175
  • Collection
  • 1993 - 2003

The Archives established the Sterling Prize Collection in 2000 at the suggestion of Professor Ted Sterling, who, with his wife Nora, established the Sterling Prize for Controversy in 1993. According to the terms of reference for the prize, it may be given for work in any field including—but not limited to—fine arts, humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and education. The primary aim of the prize is to encourage daring, creative, controversial, unconventional, and non-traditional work at SFU that also meets high standards and is morally and ethically sound. An ancillary aim is to encourage the study, at SFU, of the role of the controversial. The prize is normally awarded to a member of the SFU community—students, faculty, staff, or alumni. The winner is selected by the Sterling Prize Committee, composed of faculty. student and staff representatives.

Dr. Sterling, Professor Emeritus at SFU, was the founder of the University’s computing science program in 1973, and is an expert in computational epidemiology and the social implications of computing. He was awarded an honorary degree by SFU in 2001.

For further information on Ted and Nora Sterling and the Sterling Prize, see the file "Background Information."

In 2000, the archivist asked each previous Sterling Prize winner to give the Archives a copy of his or her Sterling Prize lecture. Some winners were able to supply a prepared text; other winners spoke from notes and supplied these. The archivist added more information to the files including announcements, press releases, articles from Simon Fraser News, print-outs from the Sterling Prize website, (http://www.sfu.ca/sterlingprize/) and other documents. SFU Media and Public Relations gave the Archives a cassette copy of Russel Ogden’s lecture for 1995. Please note that there was no prize winner for 1996.

For a list of speakers included in the collection, see Access Points.

Archives and Records Management Department

The Pedestal newspaper collection

  • F-272
  • Collection
  • 1969-1975

Collection consists of digital copies of a complete run of The Pedestal, a feminist periodical published by the Vancouver Women's Caucus and edited by the Pedestal collective. The periodical referred to itself as a women's liberation newspaper and later as a lesbian-feminist newspaper; it published non-fiction, personal stories, poetry, reviews, letters to the editor, news of the women's movement, informational resources, a dream page and a calendar of events. It was distributed to individual subscribers, women's groups and sold by members at demonstrations and political events, and was available at bookstores and other locations around Vancouver. The Pedestal engaged in debates with members and readers over homosexuality, socialism and relationships with men, and addressed political issues such as abortion, childcare, education, anti-imperialism and patriarchy.

Contributors include Liz Briemberg, Colette Connor, Deb Dubelko, Susan Dubrofsky, Pat Feindel, Barb Finlayson, Eileen Hausfather, Pat Hoffer, Nym Hughes, Beth Jankola, Sylvia Lindstrom, Judi Morton, Jean Rands, Anne Roberts, Diane Schrenk, Sharon Stevenson, Marcy Toms and Dodie Weppler.

Volume VI, Numbers 3 and 4 were published under the title Women Can.

Women's Bookstore collection

  • F-111
  • Collection
  • 1937 - 2018, predominant 1937-1997

The Women's Bookstore collection consists of materials relating to the operation of several Vancouver women's organizations and reflects the issues that dominated the women's movement throughout the 1970s. Consistent with the community based nature of women's movements during this period, the scope and content of the collection reflects the diversity common to a phenomenon rather than the administrative and subject coherence found in records generated by a single organization. As such, the collection as whole gains its coherence due primarily to the interdependence rather than independence of the individual items to one another. This also applies to the records generated by autonomous organizations in the collection. While the different organizations should be regarded as distinct, a good deal of the records concern the communication between various organizations and women's groups across the country or identify issues of concern to a broad range of organizations. Thus, the collection as whole should be regarded as a record of a dynamic process in which a common ideology served to unify the aims of distinctive organizations, persons, and subjects.

The collection is comprised of the records of the Women's Bookstore, Women's Caucus, A Woman's Place, Transition House, the British Columbia Federation of Women and the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery. Includes constitutions, minutes, reports, correspondence, position papers, and sound recordings. Also includes newsletters from women's centres across British Columbia and Canada, subject files, and an assortment of feminist publications.

Women's labour history interview collection (Sara Diamond interviewer)

  • F-67
  • Collection
  • 1978-2016, predominant 1978-1980

The Women's Labour History Project documents the histories of women who were active in the trade union movement in British Columbia from 1890s onwards. The project was initiated by Sara Diamond, an undergraduate history student at SFU, who conducted the interviews. She received financial support from the British Columbia Summer Youth Employment Fund. Additional funding was received from many other sources, including The Canada Council, and the Federal Department of Human Resources. Diamond provides a description of her research methodology in a report included as Appendix A1, "Women's Labour History Project" (available in the hard-copy finding aid only).

The collection consists of 43 interviews conducted by Sara Diamond with women in the labour movement in British Columbia. The women discuss their childhoods, family lives, careers, social issues such as childcare and birth control, economic situations such as the depresssion and post-war employment, and the working conditions that led them to become union activists. A summary of each interview is provided in Appendix 1, "Women's Labour History Project" (available in hard-copy finding aid only).

The collection contains audio recordings and transcripts.

Diamond, Sara

Women's movement collection (Andrea Lebowitz collector)

  • F-164
  • Collection
  • 1967 - 1999

Fonds contains material relating to Lebowitz's career at SFU and her participation in the Corrective Collective, a feminist writing group active in the 1970s. Fonds includes correspondence, minutes, proposals, publications, newspapers, invoices, receipts, a ledger, and other documents.

Lebowitz, Andrea

Women's movement collection (Anne Roberts collector)

  • F-166
  • Collection
  • 1969 - 1975

Fonds consists of material acquired by Anne Roberts as a member of Vancouver Women's Caucus. Includes minutes, correspondence, flyers, pamphlets, reprints, news clippings, briefs, position papers, copies of The Pedestal, and other documents.

Roberts, Anne

Women's movement collection (Candace Parker collector)

  • F-165
  • Collection
  • 1969 - 1976

In 1970 Candace Parker was a member of the Vancouver Women's Caucus and a graduate student at the University of British Columbia. For a sociology class, Parker and Sibylle Klein wrote an essay, "Developing An Ideology: the Feminist Movement in North America," which drew upon Parker's experiences in Women's Caucus. Candace Parker was also interviewed by Frances Wasserlein and the transcript of that interview is contained in the Frances Wasserlein fonds, F-162.

The collection consists of research material collected by Candace Parker in the course of preparing her essay plus some additional feminist literature acquired afterwards. Includes notes and drafts, news clippings, reprints, broadsheets, position papers, briefs, newsletters, and newspapers.

Parker, Candace

Women's movement collection (Marge Hollibaugh collector)

  • F-73
  • Collection
  • 1969 - 1970

Collection consists of two scrapbooks. One scrapbook contains newspaper clippings and other material that documents the Abortion Caravan to Ottawa in 1970. The second scrapbook documents Janiel Jolley as a protest candidate of the Simon Fraser Student Society for Miss Canadian University Beauty.

Hollibaugh, Marge

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