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Person/organization
Simon Fraser University Archives and Records Management Department

Ames, Elinor

  • Person
  • 1 October 1931 -

Elinor Ames was a charter member of the Department of Psychology at Simon Fraser University from 1965 until her retirement in 1997.

Elinor Ames was born October 1, 1931. She completed a Bachelor of Science degree at Tufts University in 1953 and a Ph.D. at Cornell University in 1960. Her research and teaching interests included developmental psychology, social psychology, personality and perception.

Archives and Records Management Department

  • Corporate body
  • 1968 -

The University Archives acquires, preserves and makes available three categories of materials: (1) the official records of the University, including those created by the Board of Governors, Senate, University committees, faculties, departments and administrative offices; (2) materials documenting the wider University community; and (3) historical research collections that promote the teaching and research activities of the University.

The Archives was established within the University Library in 1968 when librarian Liisa Fagerlund was appointed University Archivist on a half-time basis. She continued in this post until 1975 when she left the University. From 1975 to 1978, the Archives functioned within the Special Collections division of the Library. Archival duties were carried out by various library staff members. In 1978, the University Archives was established as a separate administrative unit outside of the Library. Donald Baird, recently retired as University Librarian, became University Archivist and held this position until his retirement in 1990. Jim Ross served as University Archivist from 1991 to 1993, and was succeeded by Ian Forsyth in 1994.

When the Archives was a function of the University Library, the University Archivist reported to the University Librarian. When the Archives was established as a separate administrative unit, the University Archivist reported directly to the University President. The reporting structure changed in 1986 when the University Archivist reported to the Vice-President, Research/Information Systems; in 1990, when the University Archivist reported to the Associate Vice-President, Academic; and in 1996, when the University Archivist reported to the Registrar/Dean of Students.

Association of Canadian Publishers

  • Corporate body
  • 1971 -

The Association of Canadian Publishers (ACP) has its origins in the 'Emergency Committee of Canadian Publishers', formed in Toronto in November 1970 to protest against the sale of Ryerson Press to an American-owned company. In the following months the group worked under the name of the 'interim Council of Canadian Publishers' while the permanent association was being organized. During this time a brief was presented to the federal government discussing the problems facing the Canadian book publishing industry. A founding meeting on February 19th and 20th, 1971 brought together the charter members of the new association (Appendix A).

At the first general meeting, held in late April 1971, the name 'Independent Publishers Association' (IPA) was adopted and an executive was elected (Appendix B). The constitution outlined that the first objective of the IPA was "to work for the maintenance of strong competitive book publishing houses owned and controlled in Canada" and Active membership was limited to Canadian firms which had published a minimum of 5 original Canadian titles. Associate membership was available to those that supported the IPA's objectives but did not meet the titles' criteria. The Executive in accordance with policies laid down by the general membership governed the Association on a day-to-day basis. Three committees were created at the first general meeting: Government Relations, Educational Publishing and Co-operative Promotion (Appendix C).

The IPA obtained funding from the Canada Council and the Ontario Arts Council. It operated through the offices of the Book Society and House of Anansi until acquiring its own office in Toronto in 1972. The Association hired its first Executive Director, Paul Audley, in January 1974, to work with 3 staff members. By 1974 the IPA had 40 Active members and 32 Associate members.

In addition to the issue of foreign ownership, some of the particular concerns of IPA members during this period were a lack of awareness of Canadian titles amongst the general public; the shortage of government funding; American dominance of the mass-market paperback and educational publishing fields; the disadvantages faced by small publishers in matching the sales force, warehousing and fulfillment operations of the large foreign subsidiaries; and an alarming increase in the price of paper. Researching these problems and designing co-operative strategies to overcome them was the focus of much of the IPA staff and executive's time and effort.

A federal government policy on book publishing was announced in early 1972 and the IPA participated in instituting two of the new programs. The Association for the Export of Canadian Books (AECB), funded by the Department of Industry, Trade and Commerce, sent Canadian representatives and books to foreign book fairs and established promotional agencies, known as Books Canada, in New York, London and Paris. The Book Purchase Program involved the purchase of Canadian titles by the Canada Council for distribution to Canadian consulates and libraries around the world. In later years the book kits were sent to small Canadian libraries. The IPA administered the warehousing and shipping of the selected titles.

Canadabooks, established by the IPA in 1974, grew out of the Canadian Educational Resources Project. It was a co-operative marketing organization providing promotional services to members who paid a commission on their reported sales to educational markets. The same year Canadian Basic Books evolved out of a trial project called Backlist. The program aimed to increase the stock of proven Canadian past sellers in bookstores. The Canadian Book Information Centre, earlier known as the Promotion and Information Centre, assumed responsibility for the ambitious display and book promotion activities of the IPA. Each of these programs was open to all Canadian-owned publishers, regardless of their membership in the IPA. The Canadian Publishers Project Co-ordinating Committee, which included non-IPA publishers, oversaw their development and funding while a project manager was responsible for the operation of each.

Beginning in 1974 with the formation of the BC Publishers Group, regional and special interest publishers began to organize to pursue common goals. The Literary Press Group was established in February 1975 with affiliate status and administrative assistance of the IPA. The Music Publishers Group formed in 1974. The Alberta Publishers and Atlantic Publishers Associations were created in 1975 and 1976.

Dissatisfied with government response to their concerns, IPA members had pursued for some time the formation of an umbrella organization to accommodate all the associations concerned with the book trade in Canada. The Book and Periodical Development Council, founded in January 1975, joined together the IPA, Canadian Periodical Publishers Association, Canadian Booksellers Association, Canadian Library Association, Periodical Distributors of Canada and the Writers Union in order to present a united front in lobbying the federal government, and to provide a structure for developing common policies in the industry. Paul Audley served as the BPDC Acting Director while Arden Ford became Assistant Director of the IPA.

In early 1976 a number of major firms which had maintained membership in both the IPA and the Canadian Book Publishers Council (CBPC) withdrew from the CBPC. Wishing to assert a new identity as the major trade organization of Canadian-owned firms, the IPA changed its name to the Association of Canadian Publishers, incorporated as a no-share capital corporation and altered the Association's objectives to encourage firstly the "writing, publishing, distribution and promotion of books written by Canadian authors." The ACP placed increased emphasis on promoting Canadian books abroad and began a series of professional development seminars for members.

It was perceived that the rapid growth of the IPA had resulted in an unwieldy structure and at the 1976 annual meeting, a new structure was adopted with three additional vice-presidents to oversee the various committees and projects. Another restructuring occurred in 1978 and the ACP Council returned to the format of an executive supplemented by committee chairs.

Paul Audley left the ACP in 1977 and was replaced by Arden Ford as Administrative Director while Patsy Aldana filled the role of Executive Director. In 1980 Phyllis Yaffe became Executive Director and Jane Springer replaced Libby Oughton as Associate Director. By the spring of 1980 the ACP had 70 Active members and 48 Associate members.

Association of University and College Employees, Local 2

  • Corporate body
  • 1973 - 1992

The Association of University and College Employees, Local #2 (AUCE #2) was formed at Simon Fraser University in 1974. On November 19, 1974 an election was held at SFU to determine if non-academic staff wanted a union, and if so, which union they wanted to represent them (the Simon Fraser University Staff Association or the Association of University and College Employees). Staff voted to have AUCE as their representative. Although part of a larger Provincial organization, AUCE #2 (like all AUCE locals) was established as an independent union to specifically represent the interests of non-academic staff at SFU. It was a completely autonomous unit determining its own structures, negotiating its own contracts and having complete control of its own finances, while at the same time having access to province-wide support from other AUCE locals (although each local had the right to refuse support).

Because non-academic (and non-professional) staffs were mostly women, AUCE addressed itself to problems that were particularly oppressive to women workers. In this regard, one of AUCE # 2's main objectives (along with other AUCE locals) was to bring about fair wage standards and to assure uniform job classification with equal pay for comparable work for all employees, regardless of sex, age, marital status, colour, race, religion or national origin. In addition, AUCE also sought improvement in the working conditions of its members and dedicated its efforts toward maximizing the opportunities for personal growth in the work situation.

AUCE #2 continued to represent SFU staff until 1989 when its membership voted to enter into a two-year service contract with the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE). This agreement allowed AUCE to continue as a local union in accordance with its own constitution and bylaws, but to have full access to all services and departments of CUPE. At the end of the contract, a vote was held to determine if AUCE #2 would join CUPE. On December 12, 1991 the motion was passed that effective December 31, 1991, AUCE #2 would withdraw as the representative of non-academic and non-professional staff, in favour of CUPE Local #3338.

Baker, Ron

  • Person

Ronald “Ron” James Baker was the first faculty member hired by President Patrick McTaggart-Cowan for the new Simon Fraser University (SFU) in 1964. Baker served as the university's Director of Academic Planning and as the first head of the English Department. He remained at SFU until 1969, when he was appointed to be the first president of the new University of Prince Edward Island.

Baker was born in London, England, on August 24, 1924, to James “Jim” Herbert Walter and Ethel Frances Baker (nee Miller). He served with the Royal Air Force (1943-1947), during which time he trained in Manitoba. After the war, in 1947, he immigrated to Canada.

Baker married Helen “Jo” Gillespie Elder [ca. 1947]; they would have 5 children (Sharon Ann, Lynn Frances, Ian James, Sarah Jane, and Katherine Jean). In 1975, he married Frances Marilyn Frazer (1932-2010), with whom he had one son, Ralph Edward “Ted.”

Baker graduated from the University of British Columbia (UBC) with a Bachelor of Arts in 1951 and a Master of Arts in 1953, both in English. He went on to do graduate work in the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London (1954-1956). Baker had lectured in English during his undergraduate degree at UBC, and returned to the University to become an associate professor in 1962. While at UBC, Baker was involved in the production of John B. Macdonald’s report, Higher Education in British Columbia and a Plan for the Future (1962), which led directly to the development of a second university (SFU) in the Lower Mainland.

In 1964, Baker became the first faculty member hired by President Patrick McTaggart-Cowan for the newly created SFU. Baker served as the University's Director of Academic Planning and as the first head of the English Department. He remained at SFU until 1969, when he was appointed to be the first president of the new University of Prince Edward Island (1969-1978). He continued to teach there as a professor until 1991, when he retired.

Baker served on numerous councils and committees throughout his career, including the Canadian Association of University Teachers (1954-1969), the Royal Society of Arts (Fellow, 1971-1990), the Royal Commonwealth Society (1964-1966), the National Defence Strategic Studies Committee (Chairman, 1986-1998), the Canadian Executive Service Organization (CESO) (Volunteer Advisor to First Nations Groups, 1988-2004), and the Canadian Citizen Court (Presiding Officer, 1996-2004).

Baker was made an Officer of the Order of Canada (1978), and received numerous awards and honours, including the Queen’s Silver Jubilee Medal (1977), a Canada 125 Medal (1992), and the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal (2002). He also received honourary law degrees from the University of New Brunswick (1970), Mount Allison University (1977), University of Prince Edward Island (1989), and Simon Fraser University (1990).

Bennett, W.A.C.

  • Person
  • 6 September 1900 - 23 February 1979

W.A.C. (William Andrew Cecil) Bennett (1900-1979), also known as Cecil or Cece, was a businessman and politician. He was the Premier of British Columbia from 1952-1972.

The youngest of five children, Bennett was born on September 6, 1900 in Hastings, Albert County, New Brunswick to parents Andrew Havelock Bennett and Emma Burns Bennett. He was raised Presbyterian, and maintained a strong affiliation with the church throughout his life.

In 1901, the family moved to Hampton, New Brunswick, where Bennett received his early education. In 1915, the family moved to Saint John, where Bennett attended high school. While in school, Bennett worked part time for Robertson, Foster, and Smith’s, a local hardware firm. In grade 9, Bennett left school to work full time at the hardware store, working in most of the store’s departments.

At the age of 18, Bennett moved to Edmonton, Alberta, where he worked for Marshall Wells, a large wholesale hardware firm (1919). He was quickly promoted up the ranks, eventually becoming assistant sales manager.

While in Edmonton, Bennett took correspondence courses in such subjects as accounting, business management, business law, economics, and commerce.

On February 19, 1927, Bennett, in partnership with Joe Renaud, purchased a hardware and furniture store in Westlock, Alberta. In 1928, they opened a second store in nearby Clyde, Alberta.

On July 11, 1927, Bennett married Annie “May” Elizabeth May Richards. Bennett and May had three children, Mary “Anita” (1928), Russell “R.J.” James (1929), and William “Bill” Richards (1932).

Bennett sold his share of the Westlock and Clyde stores to Renaud in 1930 and moved his family to Kelowna, British Columbia, where he bought Leckie Hardware. On January 15, 1932, he opened McEwan & Bennett Hardware in Vernon, BC. That same year, he also helped established Domestic Wine By-Products Ltd., now known as Calona Vineyards, with partners Pasquale Capozzi and Giuseppe Ghezzi.

Bennett was elected President of the Kelowna Board of Trade in 1937, and served until 1939. In 1937, he also ran, unsuccessfully, for nomination as South Okanagan candidate for the provincial Conservative Party. In 1941 he ran again, and was elected Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) for South Okanagan on October 21. Bennett was also a member of the Post-War Rehabilitation Council (1942-1946).

Bennett was active in local charities, including fundraising efforts for the Salvation Army’s Red Shield Home Front Appeal and as President of the Kelowna branch of the Red Cross Society.

In 1946, Bennett ran for leadership of the provincial Conservative Party, but was defeated by Herbert Anscomb. Bennett maintained his seat in South Okanagan until May 13, 1948, when he resigned to run as a federal Conservative candidate in the riding of Yale. He was defeated in the May 31 federal election, but was re-elected MLA for South Okanagan the following month. In 1950 he ran again for leadership of the provincial Conservative Party, but was defeated again by Anscomb.

During this time, Bennett was involved in two additional political endeavours: trying to create a Coalition Party in BC, and also attempting to reform the election system with the Transferable Voting system, in which voters could rank candidates into their first, second, third, and fourth choices.

On March 14, 1951, Bennett crossed the floor of the House to become an Independent Member. Later that year, he joined BC’s Social Credit League. He was re-elected in his riding as a Social Credit MLA on June 12, 1952, an election in which the Social Credit League of BC won a minority government. Bennett was then elected leader of the Social Credit League on July 15, and sworn in as Premier of British Columbia on August 1. This provincial election featured the Transferable Voting system which Bennett had championed. Later that year, Bennett was also made Freeman of the City of Kelowna (December 9, 1952).

On June 9, 1953, the Social Credit government was re-elected with a majority. The following year, Bennett was made Minister of Finance in conjunction with his position as Premier. In 1956, the Social Credit government was re-elected, and in 1959, Bennett and the government announced that British Columbia was free of debt.

The Social Credit government stayed in power, with Bennett at its helm, until 1972. Bennett’s government oversaw numerous infrastructure projects including road and bridge development and the expansion of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway (now British Columbia Railway Company), 1956-1958; establishment of what would become Canada’s largest ferry fleet, the British Columbia Toll Authority Ferry System (now BC Ferries), 1958; formation of B.C. Hydro and Power Authority, 1962; creation of the Bank of British Columbia, 1966 (later acquired by the Hong Kong Bank of Canada); and construction of two large-scale hydroelectric dams on the Peace and Columbia Rivers (W.A.C. Bennett and Duncan dams), 1967.

Bennett also oversaw the development of post-secondary education institutions in BC, including the establishment of British Columbia Institute of Technology (1962), University of Victoria (1963), and Simon Fraser University (1965). He was awarded an honourary Doctorate of Laws at the opening ceremonies of Simon Fraser University on September 9, 1965. SFU also named its library after Bennett in 1982.

On September 15, 1972, the Social Credit government was defeated by Dave Barrett’s provincial New Democratic Party. Bennett, who had been the longest-serving premier in BC history, was re-elected in his riding, and became the leader of the Opposition. On June 5, 1973, he resigned as South Okanagan’s MLA; his son, William “Bill” R. Bennett, won the riding in a by-election on September 7. Bennett retired as leader of the Social Credit party on November 15, and Bill was elected leader of the party on November 24. In 1975, the Social Credit party was re-elected with a majority, making Bill Bennett premier.

In 1976, W.A.C. Bennett was made an Officer of the Order of Canada. He died in Kelowna on February 23, 1979.

Braid, Kate

  • Person
  • 1947-

Kate Braid is a Vancouver poet, carpenter, trade unionist and educator. Born in Calgary, Alberta and raised in Montreal, Que, Braid received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English and history from Mount Allison University in 1967.

In 1979 she earned her Master of Arts degree in the Communications Department at Simon Fraser University with a thesis entitled Invisible Women: Women in Non-Traditional Occupations in B.C. Meanwhile, she had begun working in the construction industry herself, and in 1983 received her Interprovincial Trades Qualification and Apprenticeship Certificate (Red Seal) for carpentry construction from the Pacific Vocational Institute (later renamed the British Columbia Institute of Technology or BCIT). She was the first woman member of the Vancouver local of the International Carpenters' Union (Local 452, later 1995). In 1997 she earned her Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing at the University of British Columbia.

She continued to work in trades until 1989, forming her own company, Sisters Construction (1983-1987). Kate Braid was a founding member of the Vancouver Women in Trades Association, an advocacy and support organization that existed from 1979 to 1987.

Braid has written extensively on women and trades, including two booklets profiling Canadian tradeswomen for the Women's Bureau of Labour Canada. In addition, she prepared radio documentaries for the CBC's Ideas radio program. She has taught numerous courses and workshops since 1980, and in 1989 became the first full-time woman instructor in construction carpentry at BCIT. From 1991 to 1995, as Director of Labour Programs at SFU, she served as a liaison between academia and labour. Braid has also taught creative writing at Malaspina College (now Vancouver Island University), SFU and UBC.

Her poems and other writings have appeared in many journals and anthologies, and have been broadcast on radio and television. Her first collection of her poetry, Covering Rough Ground, won the Pat Lowther Memorial Prize in 1991. Her next collection, To this Cedar Fountain, was shortlisted for the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize in 1995. Her other publications include: Red Bait: Struggles of a Mine Local (1998), Inward to the Bones: Georgia O'Keeffe's Journey with Emily Carr (1998), Emily Carr: Rebel Artist (2000), In Fine Form: The Canadian Book of Form Poetry (2005), A Well-Mannered Storm: the Glenn Gould poems (2008), Turning Left to the Ladies (2009), and her prose memoir "Journeywoman: Swinging a Hammer in a Man's World" (2012).

She and her partner live in Vancouver, BC.

British Columbia and Yukon Association of Women's Centres

  • Corporate body
  • 1985 - 1998

The British Columbia and Yukon Association of Women's Centres (BCYAWC) was founded in 1985 as an umbrella organization of over 30 women's centres. It ceased operations in 1998.

Women's centres developed in the 1970s as a project of the women's movement. They served as women-only space to practice an egalitarian model of organization. They were devoted to improving the status of women through education and political action and to helping women through the provision of safe space, support, and services. Over the years, the number of women using women's centres increased as the centres struggled to find ongoing funding.

By 1984, women's centres were looking for a more structured way to work towards common goals, including secure funding and improved cooperation and communication among centres. In 1985 they established the BCYAWC and incorporated under the BC Society Act on November 12, 1987. By 1990, the BCYAWC consisted of 31 women's resource centres – 30 in BC, one in the Yukon. The Association was managed by a volunteer coordinating collective that included a secretary, treasurer, 11 regional representatives, and six members-at-large. Meetings were scheduled for four times a year.

Around 1993 the group began to lose its cohesiveness because of funding and other issues. In 1995, the province cut the Association's funding. The following year, the Association was struck from the Registry of Societies for failure to file required documentation such as audited financial statements. While the Association made an attempt to file the papers necessary to regain status, the remaining members in 1998 agreed to dissolve the organization and distribute its assets.

British Columbia Honey Producers Association

  • Corporate body
  • 1920 -

The British Columbia Honey Producers' Association (BCHPA) was founded in 1920 and continues as an active organization. Its functions are to promote beekeeping as a profitable activity, promote and assist in the marketing of produce and purchase of supplies, support apicultural research and education, and disseminate information about beekeeping and best practices to both Association members and the general public. BCHPA membership includes both commercial honey producers and hobbyists.

The BCHPA was formed as a result of a split within the Beekeepers Association of British Columbia, founded four years earlier in 1916. The disagreements related to the outbreak of a bee disease in 1916 and the requirement of registration for all beekeepers under the provincial government's revised Foul Brood Act. When the BCHPA broke away in 1920 it established two Divisions – Fraser Valley and Kootenay; in 1925 the Vancouver Island Beekeepers' Association joined as a third Division. The two provincial associations merged in 1931, with the older organization entering the BCHPA as the Greater Vancouver Division. Membership in the BCHPA peaked in 1978 with 1,290 members and 32 Divisions.

The BCHPA is organized into geographically based Divisions. A Central Executive acts as a coordinating body for Association-wide business, and is assisted by various standing and ad hoc committees. Divisions are headed by their own Executives and are responsible for holding divisional meetings, publishing newsletters, collecting membership fees, operating educational programs, acting as a purchasing cooperative for supplies and medications, advising the Central Executive and preparing resolutions for the BCHPA annual general meeting. The Central Executive is headed by an elected President and consists of officers elected at the annual meeting and appointed regional representatives. It functions primarily as a liaison body between the various Divisions and between the Association as a whole and the provincial Ministry, the BC Federation of Agriculture and the Canadian Honey Council. It is also responsible for producing the Association's newsletter.

British Columbia Pipers' Association

  • Corporate body
  • 1932-

The British Columbia Pipers Association (BCPA )was formed on July 30, 1932. The first meeting elected a Rod McLeod as president, William MacInDewan as secretary, and John Paul as treasurer. Subsequent meetings articulated the objects of the association, which were for "the general advancement of pipe music and to give encouragement to young players." The association held annual gatherings and regular competitions for children and adults, both amateurs and professionals. One of the first meetings banned 'lady pipers in any of the competitions other than those provided for them,' a practice which continued until 1958. The original categories for competition were Novice, Ladies, Under 16, 16 and over and Open (or professional). In 1958 these categories changed to Novice, Juvenile, Junior and Senior Amateur.

The association's motto is Tog Orm Mo Phiob (to shoulder my pipes)

Past Presidents of the BCPA

1932 to 1934 Roderick MacLeod
1934 to 1935 James Dyer
1935 to 1937 William Bowes
1937 to 1940 Walter Douglas
1940 to 1942 Allan MacNab
1942 to 1943 John Paul
1943 to 1945 WA Urquhart
1945 to 1947 RF MacRae
1947 to 1949 Charles MacKenzing
1949 to 1951 Donald MacDonald
1951 to 1955 Edmund Esson
1955 to 1955 G Sinclair (deceased while in office)
1955 to 1956 Roderick MacRae
1956 to 1957 Ron Forman
1957 to 1958 Edmund Esson
1958 to 1959 Ron Forman
1959 to 1962 Iain Walker
1963 to 1964 Ian McDougall
1965 to 1966 Rod MacVicar
1967 to 1968 Albert Duncan
1969 to 1970 Bill Lamont

British Columbia Student Federation

  • Corporate body
  • 1972 -

The British Columbia Assembly of Students (BCAS), formally established in 1966, grew out of a 1965 meeting of delegates from universities, colleges, technical schools, and secondary schools. The students wanted a province-wide forum for the discussion of issues relevant to them.

The BCAS was succeeded in 1969 by the British Columbia Union of Students, which included only university and regional college representatives. This group concentrated on issues such as unemployment, housing, and civil liberties. For example, it established a student employment task force, and produced a lengthy report on the subject.

The BC Union of Students, in turn, was succeeded in 1972 by the British Columbia Association of Student Unions, formed by representatives of 16 student councils across the province. The Association's formal structure was limited; it had no financing, no staff and no central coordination of information. To overcome these limitations, BCASU delegates resolved to restructure the organization. The result was the British Columbia Federation of Students.

In order to join the BCSF, a student organization had to conduct a referendum among its members to join the BCSF on the basis of a per student levy. The BCSF provided a means of communication between different student organizations in order to build support for common interests. An executive met regularly and was advised by a number of committees. As well, the BCSF held semi-annual conferences. The BCSF employed staff members from time to time as well as researchers to collect information on topics such as a dental plan, student housing, daycare, student employment, financial aid, transferability of courses, and the financing of post-secondary institutions.

In 1982, the Simon Fraser Student Society voted to join the Canadian Federation of Students. The BCSF reformed itself as the Canadian Federation of Students---Pacific Region.

Brose, Thomas H.

  • Person

Thomas Brose came to SFU as a charter faculty member in the Political Science, Sociology and Anthropolgy Department in l965. He remained in the Department until 1970 when he left the University. During that period, Brose served on a committee to discuss the role and organization of Joint Faculty at SFU. He also served as the temporary acting chairman of the Committee on Food.

Buitenhuis, Peter

  • Person
  • 8 December 1925 - 28 November 2004

Peter Martinus Buitenhuis (1925-2004), English professor emeritus at Simon Fraser University (SFU), was a prolific scholarly writer and literary critic. His academic career—which included teaching positions at Yale University, University of Toronto, McGill University, and University of California at Berkeley—saw the production of numerous books, articles, and reviews, including works on Henry James, E.J. Pratt, and Hugh MacLennan. Buitenhuis also conducted research and wrote on various topics pertaining to propaganda and World Wars I and II.

Of Dutch ancestry, Buitenhuis was born in Ilford Essex, England on December 8, 1925. He married three times and had seven children. With his first wife, Patricia (nee White), he had three children, Paul, Penelope, and Pym; with his second wife, Elspeth Fisher (nee Cameron), he had two children, Beatrix and Hugo; and with his third wife, Ann Cowan (nee Stephenson), he had two children, Juliana and Adrian.

In December 1943, Buitenhuis left his job as a bank clerk and enlisted in the Royal Navy. From 1943-1946, he was commissioned to several different ships, including the H.M.S. Beehive, where he served as a Navigating Officer in Coastal Forces, conducting anti-submarine and minesweeping duties in the English Channel and North Sea (1944-1945). After his time on the Beehive, Buitenhuis spent a short period in the Admiralty. In 1946, he was appointed as a navigational officer on H.M.S. Starling, where he served until his release from the Navy later that year. Buitenhuis received the 1939-45 Star, the France and Germany Star, and the Victory Medal.

Buitenhuis left the Navy to attend Jesus College at Oxford University on a veteran’s grant (1946). There he earned a BA and an MA in English language and literature. In Buitenhuis’s last year of studies, a professor from the University of Oklahoma (U of O) recruited him to teach English, thus enticing Buitenhuis to immigrate to the United States.

Buitenhuis taught at the U of O until 1951, at which time he left his position in response to an investigation by an Oklahoma legislature committee. The committee was putting pressure on the university’s employees to sign a loyalty oath to the constitution of the United States and to the constitution of Oklahoma State. Buitenhuis, neither interested in staying in Oklahoma nor signing the oath, went on to Yale University to pursue a PhD in American Studies, where he wrote his thesis on Henry James. After completing his degree, Buitenhuis stayed on at Yale’s American Studies Department to teach (1955-1959).

In 1959, Buitenhuis left Yale and immigrated to Canada, after receiving an invitation from Northrop Frye—then the chairman of the English Department at Victoria College in the University of Toronto—to teach at the College. He became a Canadian citizen c.1960, while still retaining his British citizenship.

While at Victoria College, in 1963, Buitenhuis joined with fellow Americanists from other Canadian universities to form the first American Studies association in Canada, the Canadian Association of American Studies.

Buitenhuis worked at the College as an associate professor until 1966, when he took a year to teach at the University of California (Berkley) as a visiting professor. In 1967, Buitenhuis returned to Canada to take a position at McGill University in Montreal. After several years at McGill, in 1975, Buitenhuis accepted the position of Chairman of the Department of English at Simon Fraser University (1975-1981) and moved to Vancouver.

Buitenhuis remained at SFU until his retirement in 1992. In that time, he not only taught in the Department of English, but was also the Associate Director in SFU’s Centre for Canadian Studies (1987-1988). He continued to teach literature well after his retirement through SFU’s Continuing Studies Department, and was still teaching until shortly before his death. Buitenhuis passed away on November 28, 2004.

Buitenhuis remained an active scholar, book reviewer, and writer throughout his life. Included in his many literature reviews and scholarly articles are several books, including E.J. Pratt and His Works; Five American Moderns: Mary McCarthy, Stephen Crane, J.D. Salinger, Eugene O’Neill, and H.L. Mencken; The Grasping Imagination: The American Writings of Henry James; The Great War of Words: British, American, and Canadian Propaganda and Fiction, 1914-1933; and The House of Seven Gables: Severing Family and Colonial Ties. Buitenhuis also completed a manuscript just weeks before his death titled, Empires of the Mind: British Authors' Roles in World War II.

Buitenhuis’s literary and academic career brought him into contact with many well-known authors, including Margaret Atwood, Northrop Frye, Timothy Findley, Thomas Wolfe, and Scott Symons.

Canadian Association of Geographers: Western Division

  • Corporate body

The British Columbia Division of the Canadian Association of Geographers came into being in 1958. In 1968 this Division became the Western Division of the Canadian Association of Geographers (WDCAG) and they included members of the parent body from Alberta and the Western States. The purposes of the organization are the promotion of geographical study, teaching and research. The Division holds annual meetings and publishes a newsletter and occasional papers.

Cole, Doug

  • Person
  • 9 December 1938 - 18 August 1997

Dr. Douglas Cole was a Professor of History at Simon Fraser University from 1966 to 1997. His teaching and research interests centred on Canada: specifically, on the history of Canadian art, anthropology, and Indian-White relations. He was an active member of the university community, serving on a number of committees and as president of the Faculty Association from 1986 to 1988.

Douglas Lowell Cole was born in Mason City, Washington on December 9, 1938. In 1960, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington.

Cole went on to complete his masters degree at George Washington University in Washington, DC in 1962 and then completed his Ph.D. at the University of Washington in 1968. Both his post-graduate degree theses focused on topics relevant to Canadian history. His MA thesis, "The United States and Canadian Diplomatic Independence, 1918-1926," and his Ph.D. thesis "John S. Ewart and the Canadian Nation," prepared him to accept a position teaching topics in Canadian history at Simon Fraser University.

During his career, Dr. Cole wrote numerous scholarly articles and books. In 1977, he co-wrote From Desolation to Splendour, a history of the changing perceptions of BC's landscape. Other books include Phillips in Print : The Selected Writing of Walter Phillips on Canadian Nature and Art (co-authored with M. Tippett), Captured Heritage, and An Iron Hand Upon the People (co-authored with Ira Chaikin). He has also contributed to BC Studies, Journal of Canadian Studies, Canadian Review of Nationalism, Canadian Historical Review, and others.

Dr. Cole was also the recipient of a number of awards, citations and honours. He was a finalist for the Harold Adams Innis Prize for best work in English in Social Sciences for An Iron Hand Upon the People. He was also awarded a Regional History Award from the Canadian Historical Association in 1987, the Molson Research Prize in 1986, and the Eaton Award for the best British Columbia book in 1978. Dr. Cole was also granted a University Research Professorship in 1990.

Dr. Cole passed away August 18, 1997.

Dunham, Robert

  • Person
  • 1939 - 1990

Robert Dunham (1939-1990) was a professor of English at Simon Fraser University. His specialty was the literature of the Romantic Period. A graduate of Stanford University, Dunham joined SFU in 1966. He was a gifted teacher who won the University's excellence in teaching award in 1986 as well as the 3M Fellowship in 1988, a national award which recognized excellence in teaching and educational leadership.

Ellis, John F.

  • Person

John Ellis came to SFU as a charter faculty member in the Faculty of Education. He received his Ed.D degree from the University of California at Berkeley and had a twenty-year career in public education before joining the University to direct the Professional Foundations Program. He served as temporary acting president of SFU for four days following the resignation of Patrick McTaggart-Cowan in May 1968.

In November of that year, a series of protests against Simon Fraser University's admissions policies and inconsistent accreditation for courses taken at other institutions culminated in a 65 hour "sit-in" in the University Administration Offices. The University Senate responded by charging Professor Ellis with the responsibility of "the development of a definitive and comprehensive admissions and standings policy in consultation with an advisory committee..." (Simon Fraser University Senate. Minutes of Meeting held November 20, 1968. Although there was an "advisory committee" named by Senate, the final report is the product of Dr. Ellis' research, reflection and writing. Admissions and Standards: A Suggested Policy was released late March 1969. In June 1969, Senate adopted the recommendations of the report with only minor revisions. The admissions controversy was effectively defused.

The Ellis Report as it was re-titled by the university community, was widely applauded in post-secondary education circles in British Columbia, and played an important role in the development of Simon Fraser University.

Finlayson, Thelma

  • Person

Thelma Finlayson is a distinguished entomologist who served as a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Simon Fraser University from 1967 until her retirement in 1979. Her research interests have centered on the classification of immature stages of insect parasites of forest and agricultural pests. Since 1979 she has been Professor Emerita and continues to be actively involved with the university, contributing time, counsel and private funds. The university established the Thelma Finlayson Society in 1989 in honour of her many contributions to SFU.

Fraser Valley University Society

  • Corporate body
  • 1991 - 1998

The Fraser Valley University Society was established on February 5, 1991. Founding members of the Society included members of several Canadian Federation of University Women's clubs, particularly Karen Yong and Sharon Shilliday of the Delta University Women's Club; members of the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board; as well as individuals and representatives of organizations from communities throughout the Fraser Valley. Many of these individuals had been involved in a predecessor group, the Fraser South University Society, which had been established by Yong and Shilliday in November 1990.

The Society's mandate was to "ensure the development of appropriate legislation creating a new university in the Fraser Valley." The main purposes of the Society were: to further the development of university education in the Fraser Valley by encouraging the Provincial Government to legislate the establishment of an independent, degree-granting institution; to foster public education initiatives promoting the social, economic and cultural value of a university; to actively pursue excellence in university education for all communities in the Fraser Valley; and to improve access to university education.

The Society was headed by an elected Board of Directors. The Board of Directors appointed the following officer positions: President, Vice-President, Treasurer, and Secretary. Committees, headed by a Chair, were created to carry out the objectives of the Society. The original five committees of the society were the Public Relations Committee, Community Relations Committee, Fundraising Committee, Membership Committee, and the Government Committee. The first President of the Society was Karen Yong. She was succeeded in 1993 by Robert (Bob) Lowe, who remained President until the Society's dissolution. At its height, membership in the Society was over 1,100 members.

The Society enlisted the assistance of local government and community organizations in its efforts. From its inception, the Society received financial and other support, including office space in Surrey, from the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board. Other funds were obtained through government grant applications, membership fees, donations, and fundraising events. The Society also concentrated on promotional and community relations activities. Members collected over 7,000 petition signatures, set up information kiosks in malls and at public events, made presentations to local groups, solicited media coverage of Society events and activities, and distributed promotional material. The Society created and collaborated on several reports concerning the need for post-secondary education in the Fraser Valley, and established relationships with members of local and provincial governments.

In 1994 the Society began to place increased pressure on the Provincial Government and, after many meetings and much correspondence, Premier Mike Harcourt announced in February 1995 his government's support for the creation of a Technical University in the Fraser Valley (the Technical University of British Columbia). In May 1995 Society Board member Sharon Shilliday was appointed to the Interim Planning Council for the University; the Council became part of the Technical University Society of British Columbia when it was registered on August 10, 1995.

As a result of the Government's commitment to the creation of a new university, the Society evolved into a public foundation responsible for raising funds for the Technical University of British Columbia and its students. The Society's constitution was amended in August 1996 to reflect this change in mandate. In February 1998, a unanimous decision was made to dissolve the Society and transfer its fundraising responsibilities, as well as accumulated funds, assets, and records to the Technical University of British Columbia. Fundraising responsibilities were assumed by the University's new Vice-President External Affairs and Research. At an extraordinary meeting of the Society on April 28, 1998, the Society was dissolved.

Garland, Iris

  • Person
  • 23 June 1935 - 29 October 2002

Iris Lillian Garland (1935-2002) taught dance from the University’s inception to her retirement as Professor Emeritus from the School for the Contemporary Arts (SCA) in 2000. As a charter member of SFU, Garland established and was involved in the growth of the contemporary dance program, which began as components of the Recreational Program in the Faculty of Education, and ultimately grew to become an academic degree program in the SCA.

Garland was born on June 23, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois. She earned a BS in 1957 at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she majored in physical education and graduated in the top three percent of her class. She went on to earn her MSc in 1960 at the University of California at Los Angeles. Garland spent the next five years as an instructor in physical education at the University of North Dakota and then the University of Washington, before joining SFU as an instructor in the Physical Development Centre of the Faculty of Education in September 1965. It was at SFU that Garland also met her husband, James Warren Felter, who served as the first Curator/Director of the Simon Fraser Gallery.

Early on, Garland was an outspoken supporter of the creation of an academic unit offering credit courses and programs in the fine and performing arts at SFU. Meanwhile, she grew the contemporary dance program from its humble beginnings within the Faculty of Education into workshops and intensives offered through Kinesiology and a fledgling Centre for Communications and the Arts, bolstered by guest performers and artists in residence as instructors. With the establishment of the Centre for the Arts in 1975, dance was ultimately elevated from non-credit workshops to credit courses alongside those in film, music, theatre, visual arts, and art history. Garland’s continued efforts helped to establish an academic dance minor program in 1976, and a dance major program by 1980. After the Centre became the School for the Contemporary Arts in 1989, dance became an academic BFA degree program and part of an interdisciplinary MFA offered by the SCA.

Throughout her career, Garland continued her dance education, pursuing studies in modern, dance notation, and a voice intensive in theatre. She also studied ballet under Mary Ann Wells in Seattle and Mara McBirney in Vancouver. In 1983, at the University of Washington, she became a Certified Movement Analyst, a program incorporating Laban Movement Analysis, which Garland went on to feature in her teaching. A significant contribution to her teaching was the creation of the unique telelearning course, “Dancing in Cyberspace: Creating with the Virtual Body,” which she co-developed in the 1990s with Lisa Marie Naugle, a PhD student from New York University. The course was offered through SFU's Centre for Distance Education and utilized Life Forms, a software program developed by Dr. Thomas W. Calvert in the SFU Computing Science Department. Life Forms allowed for the study and choreography of animated human figures in dance and movement. The course was popular with distant education SFU students, as well as national and international learners. In 1998, Garland was invited to present “New Technologies for Choreographers: Life Forms Workshop and Seminar” to professional choreographers in Sydney, Australia.

Garland was popular with her superiors, colleagues, and students alike, and commended often for her hard work and dedication not only to the University, but also to the dance community as a whole both locally and nationally. In 1991, she was awarded SFU Teacher of the Year. In addition to her teaching, Garland served on multiple departmental and university committees throughout her SFU career. Within the dance community, Garland participated as an independent choreographer and performer at various dance festivals and concerts, first in the 1970s through the Burnaby Mountain Dance Company, which was originally formed with SFU dancers in 1973. She later showcased her work through the Off-Centre Dance Company, which began in 1985 under the direction of various SFU dance faculty and later absorbed into the SFU dance program to provide advanced students an opportunity to be part of an ensemble and perform publicly. From the late 1980s into the 1990s, Garland featured her work at Vancouver’s Dancing on the Edge Festival of Contemporary Dance, an event which continues today. At the national level, Garland was heavily involved with the Dance in Canada Association as a member of the board in the 1970s and as a conference organizer into the 1980s. Her dedication to the Association earned her an Outstanding Service Award in 1985.

In addition to her main research interests in early modern dance history, dance and technology, and dance analysis and choreography, Garland developed an interest in Spanish dancer Tórtola Valencia (1882-1955). She began researching the life of this early modern dancer in earnest, travelling to Spain to conduct further study, and presenting several conference papers on the topic in the 1990s. Garland had begun writing a biography of Tórtola Valencia when she was diagnosed with cancer in early 2002. She passed away in North Vancouver, BC, on October 29, 2002.

Halpern family

  • Family

The Halpern Family fonds consists of the personal archives of five members of the Halpern family: Simon (1865-1939) and Rosalie (1875-1951) Halpern; their daughter Fanny Halpern (1899-1952), a psychiatrist; their son George Halpern (1902-1989), a businessman and philanthropist; and his wife Ida Halpern (1910-1987), a noted ethnomusicologist.

Simon Halpern was born on June 6, 1865. He was a Surgeon-General in the Austrian Army. He died in 1939. Simon’s wife Rosalie Halpern (nee Salkind) was born on November 19, 1875, in Kremenczuk, Russia. She died in Shanghai, China, on June 26, 1951.

Fanny Gisela Halpern was born August 1, 1899 in Krakow, Poland. After graduating in medicine from the University of Vienna in 1924, she worked in various clinics in that city. Her interest in neurology and psychiatry led her to study with Professor Wagner-Jauregg, who had received the Nobel Prize for developing the malarial treatment of syphilis.

Fanny was invited to China in November 1933 to teach at the Medical College of China in Shanghai. She later taught at Shanghai’s St. John's University and Women's Christian Medical College. In 1935 she organized China's first modern psychiatric hospital, Shanghai Mercy Hospital for Nervous Diseases. She became the hospital's medical director, while at the same time serving as a consultant to several other medical institutions.

Fanny founded the first Committee on Psychiatry in China. She also established a Committee on Mental Hygiene in Shanghai, which became the Mental Hygiene Association of that city. The group consisted mainly of volunteers who worked in mental hygiene and child guidance clinics. She wrote many articles on psychiatry and neurology and presented papers at scientific meetings in Europe and China.

For much of her time in Shanghai, Fanny shared her life and home with her mother, Rosalie, who joined her there after Simon's death in 1939. Shortly after her mother passed away in 1951, Fanny moved to Vancouver to be near her brother, George, and his wife, Ida. Fanny Halpern died on June 26, 1952.

George Robert Halpern was born in Krakow, Poland on May 11, 1902. In 1936 he married Ida (nee Ruhdörfer), who was born on July 17, 1910, in Vienna, Austria, to Heinrich and Sabine Ruhdörfer.

George Halpern had a Ph.D. in chemistry, and as a research chemist, developed a number of pharmaceutical and cosmetic preparations that were manufactured in Vienna and later in Italy (1936-1937) after he established a factory there. Halpern's medicines, with such names as "gelamon" and "jonojod," were advertised for the treatment of various illnesses including asthma, rheumatism, atherosclerosis, and syphilis. Halpern's cosmetic products included skin creams and hair tonics.

Once Ida received her doctorate in music in July 1938, she and George decided to leave Vienna. That October they moved to Shanghai to be with George's sister Fanny. While there, Ida taught music history at the University of Shanghai. George considered opening a pharmaceutical factory in Shanghai as well, but instead in 1939 he and Ida left for Canada.

Arriving in Vancouver in August, the Halperns were initially placed under a deportation order. They succeeded in gaining landed immigrant status through the intervention of R.D. Murray, manager of the Chartered Bank of India, Australia, and China located in Shanghai. Murray offered financial guarantees regarding Halpern's proposed business enterprises.

George hoped to manufacture cosmetics in Vancouver, but was discouraged by George Cunningham, the owner of the city's largest drugstore chain, who told George that his stores only dealt with nationally advertised products. Instead, after inventing chocolate-covered cod-liver oil pills for children, George established his own company, Dr. G. Halpern (Vienna) Laboratories, which manufactured the product for a short time (ca. 1939-1941).

In May 1941 George joined the Canadian Fishing Company as a research chemist. His role was to develop products, such as vitamin oils and poultry feed, that could be manufactured from fish. Halpern also joined a professional association, the Chemical Institute of Canada, and became chairman of its Vancouver section. In 1953, the Canadian Fishing Company’s management curtailed its research activities, and Halpern had to seek other employment. In 1954, he opened his own business, G.R. Chemicals, Ltd., which manufactured "Ply-O-Seal" plastic patching compounds for the plywood industry.

In 1969, George sold the assets of G.R. Chemicals to the H.B. Fuller Company (Canada) Ltd. He then formed a new company, G.R. Chemicals (1969), Ltd., an investment business which owned some property and whose principal income came from interest and rent. This business existed until 1986.

Ida taught music lessons in the Halperns’ home and also lectured in music appreciation and later in ethnomusicology at UBC. In 1947 she began recording the music of First Nations peoples of the Pacific Northwest, being one of the first to study the subject. In 1948 she helped found, and was first president of, the Friends of Chamber Music in Vancouver. Ida wrote numerous articles and a few books on First Nations music, and also published some sound recordings.

Both George and Ida Halpern were noted benefactors to two of British Columbia's universities, the University of Victoria, and Simon Fraser University (SFU). They were convocation founders of SFU in 1965, and their financial support enabled the construction of the George and Ida Halpern Centre at that institution. George was present at the Halpern Centre's official opening on May 24, 1989. As well, the Halperns donated several important paintings to SFU.

Ida was awarded an honourary doctorate from SFU in 1978, and was made a Member of the Order of Canada in the same year. She continued to lecture, and to consult on First Nations music for films and other productions. In 1986, the University of Victoria also awarded her an honourary doctorate. Ida died in Vancouver on February 7, 1987.

During his later years, George played a broad role in community activities. He served as President of Brock House, a community centre for senior citizens, which he helped to establish, in 1974, in a local heritage building. He and Ida both served on its board of directors for a number of years. He was also elected a member of the Dunbar-West Point Grey-Southlands Community Resources Board in 1973. The Board promoted the general well being of seniors in the area through such projects as the seniors' housing complex at Fourth Avenue and Wallace Street. George Halpern died in Vancouver on November 28, 1989.

Harrison, Robert F.

  • Person
  • 1925 -

Robert F. Harrison is one of the key contributors to the architecture of Simon Fraser University. His firm was responsible for designing and building the WAC Bennett library according to design specifications outlined by Erickson and Massey (the architects responsible for the overall design of the university). Harrison's firm also designed and built the Academic Services building, and made later alterations to it and to other buildings on campus.

Robert Harrison was born in Vancouver in 1925. He became a registered architect in 1954, and became the Registrar of the Architectural Institute of British Columbia in 1961. Later, Harrison was made Chair of the Institute's Examining Board (circa 1964). In 1963 Harrison submitted an entry to the contest to design the new university that would be built on top of Burnaby Mountain. His design finished 4th place. According to the contest parameters, the top five winners would each be given a contract to build a section of the campus according to the winner's overall design. Harrison took Erickson and Massey's basic outline for the library, and expanded it to reflect his own ideas. After the first phase of building, Harrison designed a new administration building in keeping with the architectural character of the university. He also made alterations to the Academic Quadrangle, designed later additions to the library, and made alterations to other buildings at Simon Fraser University.

Hayward, F. Margaret

  • Person
  • 1919 -

F. Margaret Hayward was the founder and first director of the Reading and Study Centre at SFU.

She was born in Vancouver in 1919, received her BA and Social Work Diplomas from UBC in 1941 and 1943 respectively, and later earned an MA in psychology from Case Western Reserve University in 1951. Hayward worked as a social worker, counselor, and specialist in reading improvement

In 1963 Hayward wrote to Chancellor Gordon Shrum to suggest that the new university develop a Reading Service to improve the study skills of its students. Shrum and President Patrick McTaggart-Cowan agreed with her proposal and hired Hayward to be the Director of the Reading and Study Centre at SFU at the rank of Assistant Professor. The Centre was administratively placed in the Department of Psychology because Hayward believed that it was important to emphasize the academic nature of the program. Under Hayward's leadership, the Centre operated successfully for several years. When the Centre was moved to University Services in 1971, Hayward resigned her position and left the University.

Hobler, Philip M.

  • Person
  • - 2006

Philip Hobler was a professor of archaeology at Simon Fraser University. He worked in various sites in Egypt, USA, and on the West Coast of British Columbia. For many years he captained the archaeological research vessel Sisiutil. Dr. Hobler passed away on July 19, 2006.

Hope, Fred

  • Person
  • 1917-1991

Fred Hope was born in Lancaster, England in 1917. He was a police officer with the London Police Service and also served in the Second World War. Hope came to Canada in 1952 working as an investigator for the Canadian Pacific in Montreal. In 1965 he joined the establishment at Simon Fraser University as the Director of Traffic and Security. He died in Sechelt in 1991.

Iredale, W. Randle

  • Person
  • 1929 -

W. Randle Iredale is one of the contributors to the architecture of Simon Fraser University. He and his partner, William R. Rhone, were responsible for designing and building the Science Complex according to design specifications outlined by Erickson and Massey (the architects responsible for the overall design of the university). Rhone and Iredale built the Science Complex in three phases based on preliminary drawings by Erickson and Massey, but added their own ideas and innovations to the building.

Iredale was born in Calgary, Alberta in 1929. In 1955 he received a degree in architecture from the University of British Columbia, and went to work for McCarter and Nairne until Iredale was registered in 1957. He had his own practice from 1957 to 1959, and then formed a partnership with William R. Rhone. In 1963 Rhone and Iredale submitted an entry to the contest to design the new university that would be built on top of Burnaby Mountain. Their design finished in second place. According to the contest parameters, the top five winners would each be given a contract to build a section of the campus according to the winner's overall design. Originally, Rhone and Iredale chose the Academic Quadrangle, but changed their minds and picked the Science Complex, which Chancellor Gordon Shrum had assured them would be expanded on a regular basis. The Science Complex was built in three phases between 1964 and 1971: Phase I was substantially completed by August 1, 1965, Phase II was completed September 7, 1966 and Phase III was completed in 1971. Rhone and Iredale also designed and built the student pub, circa 1970.

Irwin, Michael

  • Person

Michael Irwin was employed by Simon Fraser University at the SFU Theatre.

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